Monday, December 14, 2015

Final Blog: Put a Dent in the Universe


Jack Werd
Period 6
Final Exam Blog

Put a Dent in the Universe

“Don’t let the noise of other's opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your own heart and intuition.” Steve Jobs went from being a college dropout, to one of the most influential people on today’s society. The company Apple went from a small business In Jobs's garage, to one of the most global, profitable, and popular companies on the planet. This got me curious about Job’s story and what exactly made him so successful. Also, what can the average person take away from Jobs and his story?

Jobs was born in San Francisco California and was later adopted and raised by caring parents. Looking back on his life, Job’s remembers how much his parents stressed academic success. However, Job’s as a young child was “far from an academic.” Despite his immense intelligence, Job’s wasn’t interested in schooling. He was interested in things like pranking phone computers, creating business ideas, and messing around with technology. He attended college for one year, only to drop out where he soon started building home aid computers in his garage with his friend Steve Wozniak. So what was so special about Job’s early life? What can we learn from it? Steve Jobs was a nonconformist. We live in a world today where you’re supposed to get an education, get a job, have a family, retire, and die. But as Jobs said, “Your time is limited, so don’t spend time living someone else's life.” What I have taken away from Job’s early life is that you can’t worry about what everyone else is thinking, you have to do what you love because one day, you’re gonna run out of time.

So what exactly made Jobs so successful and what should be taken away from what he did with his career? Job’s was successful because he did what he loved, he tried to put a dent in the universe, and he created insanely different experiences for people. First is do what you love. As Jobs said, “People with passion can change the world for the better.” Jobs found what he loved to do and didn’t care what anyone else thought. Because of this, he was able to put countless amounts of time and energy into his craft which in turn lead to ultimate success. Next is dream big and attempt to put a dent in the universe by changing the world. He once asked president of Pepsi-Cola “Do you want to spend your life selling sugar water or do you want to change the world?” As he said you can't lose sight of your big vision and “The ones who are crazy enough to change the world usually do.” The final one is to create different experiences and change lives. When Jobs first came up with the idea for an Apple store he said that instead of just moving boxes, they would be enriching lives. Create an emotional connection between you and your job and “sell dreams not products.”

So I found myself asking, what do all these things have in common and what what would be one word describe Steve Jobs and his success. The theme of all Job’s values again came down to nonconformity. He didn’t care what other people thought and was willing to do anything to achieve his goals. He tried to blaze his own trail as opposed to follow in someone else's footsteps. As Jobs said “Here's to the crazy ones, the misfits, the troublemakers, the ones who see things differently.”


https://www.ted.com/talks/steve_jobs_how_to_live_before_you_die














2 comments:

  1. Jack, Fine job blogging this term, overall. Steve Jobs is a generally regarded as a rebel and nonconformist. But, this post feels a little superficial. You offer a picture at the end and some quotes from an article here, but you don't really analyze the language of those quotes or suggest what forces SJ was resisting. What forces are discouraging or encouraging rebels such as Jobs? Does the "successful" example of Steve Jobs hold any wisdom for the way in which we see McCandless, for example? Or are their stories fundamentally irreconcilable?

    ReplyDelete
  2. Jack, Fine job blogging this term, overall. Steve Jobs is a generally regarded as a rebel and nonconformist. But, this post feels a little superficial. You offer a picture at the end and some quotes from an article here, but you don't really analyze the language of those quotes or suggest what forces SJ was resisting. What forces are discouraging or encouraging rebels such as Jobs? Does the "successful" example of Steve Jobs hold any wisdom for the way in which we see McCandless, for example? Or are their stories fundamentally irreconcilable?

    ReplyDelete